Open-Records Laws and Copyright Protection for State and Municipal Data

This past term the Supreme Court decided McBurney v. Young, a case involving a constitutional challenge to the citizen-only restriction of Virginia’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Virginia law allowed citizens of Virginia to inspect and copy all state public records, but the act did not grant non-citizens the same right. The Court had little trouble unanimously ruling that neither the Privileges and Immunities Clause nor the dormant Commerce Clause barred the citizen-only restriction.

Although McBurney involved the copying of government data, it did not discuss the effects of copyright law on that copying. Copyright law governs reproduction. 17 U.S.C. § 106. State open-records laws, like Virginia’s FOIA, govern access to information—i.e, public availability. Open-records laws involve concerns regarding both access and copying, because state and municipal databases may contain information that is in the public domain and information protected by copyright. Public-domain information is information that is not covered by intellectual property rights (e.g., copyright). Black’s Law Dictionary 1265 (8th ed. 2004) (“When copyright, trademark, patent, or trade-secret rights are lost or expire, the intellectual property they had protected because part of the public domain and can be appropriated by anyone….”).

It is a common misconception that if government data is publicly available then it cannot be copyrighted. Case law, however, confirms the distinction between public-domain information and publicly available information with respect to open-records laws and copyright. In County of Suffolk v. First Am. Real Estate, 261 F.3d 179, 188-90 (2nd Cir. 2001), the appellate court analyzed the interplay between copyright ownership of municipal maps and open-records laws. The court held that open-records laws do not abrogate a copyright holder’s ownership of the publicly available information.  Id. at 190; accord Weisberg v. U.S. Dept. of Justice, 631 F.2d 824, 825, 828-30 (D.C. Cir. 1980) (records do not lose copyright protection simply because they become publicly available). Some courts hold that the Copyright Act “is not restricted to private parties and there is no reason to believe that such a restriction should be upheld. In fact, the opposite inference is required when only one specific governmental entity, the United States of America, is excluded from the protection of the Act.” E.g., Nat’l Conference of Bar Examiners v. Multistate Legal Studies, Inc., 495 F. Supp. 34, 35 (N.D. Ill. 1980), aff’d, 692 F.2d 478 (7th Cir. 1982).

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Posted on July 15, 2013, in Copyright, Other IP, Public Domain, State Law and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Open-Records Laws and Copyright Protection for State and Municipal Data.

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